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2017 StateMap Project 1_Logansport 1:100,000 scale quadrangle bedrock mapping

Issue

Objective

Contact: Tracy Branam (tbranam@indiana.edu)



Critical zone karst observatory

Issue

While Indiana University was an early leader in North American karst research in the 1940s through 1970s, only sporadic and limited studies have occurred since the 1980s, primarily driven by specific development or regulatory concerns (e.g., I-69 and SR-37 expansion). The Indiana Geological and Water Survey (under the lead of Dr. Lee Florea, the Assistant Director for Research and a Licensed Professional Geologist) will undertake a sequence of five parallel investigations over two years to broaden our understanding of karst hydrogeology in the SWCI area.

Objective

1) Designing and implementing an online registry and inventory system for dye traces that will update IndianaMap and provide notifications to the Indiana Department of Homeland Security and emergency management professionals in the location where such traces occur. a. This project mimics the implementation by the Kentucky Division of Water that provides a record of all dye traces conducted in the state. Information from these dye traces are incorporated into statewide maps that help state agencies create and implement development and construction plans. b. Indiana citizens benefit from this project by having a source of information for active, and justified, projects that define groundwater flow. c. Emergency professionals benefit from this project by having an actively updated source of information to distribute in advance of planned tracing activities or answer questions or concerns from citizens. 2) Soliciting existing dye trace data in state/federal agencies, universities, and consulting firms to enhance the presently existing layer in IndianaMap. a. Decades of dye-trace data are presently scattered among environmental consultants, cave enthusiasts, and state agencies. This project will create and authoritative repository and source for these data. b. This effort enhances existing layers in IndianaMap (http://maps.indiana.edu) by collecting all dye trace data in a free public-accessible and searchable site. 3) Conducting a sequence of dye traces in Harrison/Crawford Counties in collaboration with private landowners, tourist caves, state/federal agencies, and municipalities to better outline the boundaries of groundwater basins. a. This project was specifically requested by Mr. Rand Heazlitt, manager of the Town of Corydon and a co-investor of Indiana Caverns. b. Additional dye tracing will help guide exploration and define the limits of the landscape that contributes water to Indiana Caverns. c. Targeted tracing will also help illustrate the direction and speed of groundwater flow, which can help Mr. Heazlitt leverage state funding to expand the sanitation system of the Town of Corydon in response to increased housing development. 4) Installing a set of field-based geochemical and water-level monitoring instrumentation in caves, wells, and springs of the Blueppring and Lost River karst basins of Lawrence and Orange Counties to provide insight into changes in water chemistry and discharge across the karst basins and during individual storms. a. One outcome of this project is an increased understanding of how the landscape responds to rainfall, which have caused considerable flooding and are projected to become greater in intensity with climate change. b. Data from some sites in this project will be made available online for the public and to visitors of Bluespring Cavern in real time on a website that can be live streamed in the visitor center. 5) Collecting water samples at six (6) locations in the Lost River karst basin that, when combined with the data in project 4, provide unique and valuable insight into the transport of carbon, nutrients, and sediments in an agriculturally intensive landscape. a. The data from projects 4 and 5 will be used to create a comprehensive view of the rate of nutrient and sediment loss from these karst basins. b. Such results are vitally important to better refining the role of karst landscapes in the global carbon cycle. c. Results from this study will provide one node of data that can help model water quality changes in the Mississippi River watershed and better predict the ‘dead zone’ in the Gulf of Mexico caused by excess nutrients.

Contact: Tracy Branam (tbranam@indiana.edu)



IDEM RiverWatch Program

Issue

No data has been collected on a segment of Richland Creek in northeastern Greene County since 2001. Richland Creek has been identified as a PCB-contaminated stream.Since the last sampling, conducted by IDEM personnel, numerous land-use changes have occurred upstream from the monitoring point. The program affords the opportunity to collect new data and provide a mentoring opportunity for interested high school students with access to the stream at the designated monitoring location.

Objective

Collect pertinent data for the IDEM volunteer stream monitoring program known as RiverWatch. Students will be trained to (1) collect water quality data consisting of: temperature, conductivity, pH, redox, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), turbidity, nitrate, phosphate; (2) flow estimation of stream using cross-section and velocity method; (3) record physical description of stream and bank up to 200 ft above monitoring point, describing stream bed, riparian zone, and sinuosity of stream; (4) collection and identification of macroinvertebrates living in stream at monitoring site, (5) test for total coliform and E. coli bacteria in stream. Student activity will be monitored and assisted as needed. Students will enter data into online forms at IDEM website.Monitoring activity will be conducted once each season for one year for a total of 4 monitoring days.

Contact: Tracy Branam (tbranam@indiana.edu)



Planning, coordination, and training associated with lead sampling activities in schools

Issue

The state of Indiana has an objective to test the drinking water of all public school buildings for the presence of lead, to interested schools and school districts. Because lead can enter the drinking water distribution system through the corrosion of a variety of plumbing materials (pipes, fittings, fixtures, solder, and flux), it is important to identify potential problems at the fixture level under normal water?use conditions (i.e., when schools are in session). A secondary issue is the need to characterize and understand the water chemistry that feeds the water-distribution system of schools to evaluate the potential for pipe or fixture corrosivity from that water. Current methods to identify problems are implemented through the Lead and Copper Rule (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, (https://www.epa.gov/dwreginfo/lead-and-copper-rule), which provides guidance to systems that find lead exceedances in their lead analyses, but does not offer any method to predict systems that might develop a problem over time from the water supply itself.

Objective

The objective is to provide comprehensive planning, coordination, and sampling services for all schools that express interest and participate in the Indiana school water sampling program.

Contact: Sally Letsinger (sletsing@indiana.edu)



Spatial analysis of significant water withdrawal facilities in Indiana

Issue

The issue of water-resources planning is coming to the forefront in Indiana. Early reconnaissance studies have indicated that incomplete or inaccurate databases might inhibit studies that rely on those data. Therefore, examination of existing databases and creation of new, targeted, and relevant databases related to water resources are needed in Indiana.

Objective

This project will support the larger effort of improving the data accuracy in databases important to water resources planning in Indiana.

Contact: Sally Letsinger (sletsing@indiana.edu)



Unconsolidated sediment (soil) core description database forms - Core-nucopia

Issue

A great deal of effort is put into describing soil core for various geologic investigations but recording descriptors on paper forms and then converting that paper data to an electronic format for further processing is cumbersome and rarely accomplished.

Objective

Contact: Shawn Naylor (snaylor@indiana.edu)